Comments Off on Stoßtrupp 1917 from IHF

Stoßtrupp 1917 from IHF

2011
01.20

Oh holy sheepshit Margaret!! It’s a BEAUTIFUL copy… Clear and detailed… With subtitles (meaning I can actually, really get what they are saying).

Stoßtrupp 1917 is the final part of the “Holy Trinity” of WWI German videos and, I think, the crown jewel.

Lavishly filmed using real Wehrmacht Soldiers and SA men. Real munitions were used in the filming… That Schrapnel hitting the water ain’t CGI Buckey! And SO clear… The first private video that I can see clearly. It is a “must-see” for any German reenactor. It is SO much better than “All Quiet on the Western Front” or “Westfront 1918″… This movie is pretty awesome and I cannot recommended it enough!!

Here is the description from IHF (whom you should buy this movie from)…

Uneasy lies the countryside beneath the stench of war. Stosstrupp 1917 (Shock Troop 1917) is the story of the steel hurricane known as the Great War, told from the German perspective. Lewis Milestone’s All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) had been fiercely pacifistic, and G. W. Pabst’s Westfront 1918 (1930) no less so, but while Hans Zoberlein’s equally lavish Stosstrupp 1917 is also antiwar, it is more sympathetic to Germany’s trench-warfare ordeal. All Quiet on the Western Front and Westfront 1918 are universally hailed as the two greatest First World War films ever produced, based as much on the astonishingly mobile cinematography of Arthur Edeson and Fritz Arno Wagner as on their masterly direction. Regrettable is the omission of Stosstrupp 1917 from this pantheon, for its cinematography by Karl Hasselmann is as uniformly dazzling.
An enormous box-office hit upon its release on 20 February 1934, Stosstrupp 1917 was based on director Zoberlein’s own war memoirs, Der Glaube an Deutschland, to which Adolf Hitler contributed a foreword; was financed by the National Socialist government; and featured Wehrmacht and SA troops in its cast, which make its invisibility since 1945 more readily comprehensible. The picture has been banned in Germany since the end of the Nazi era. Prints that have circulated since then have been heavily censored and run less than 90 minutes, removing militaristic dialogue and diluting the film’s impact and painstaking realism; many of its pyrotechnics, for instance, were produced with real ammunition and explosives. The present release restores 21 minutes of missing footage. Directed by Hans Zöberlein, Franz Adam, Marian Kolb, and L. Schmid-Wildy. Starring Ludwig Schmid-Wildy, Beppo Brem, Max Zankl, Hans Possenbacher.

Anyway, this movie is WAY better than the other two movies mentioned. Ack! You HAVE to watch it. Oh wait, that’s if you’re a historian or WWI reenactor–if you’re just some American Idol-watchin’ shallow, sheeple, no, you probably won’t like it. I don’t care, I do.

Uneasy lies the countryside beneath the stench of war. Stosstrupp 1917 (Shock Troop 1917) is the story of the steel hurricane known as the Great War, told from the German perspective. Lewis Milestone’s All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) had been fiercely pacifistic, and G. W. Pabst’s Westfront 1918 (1930) no less so, but while Hans Zoberlein’s equally lavish Stosstrupp 1917 is also antiwar, it is more sympathetic to Germany’s trench-warfare ordeal. All Quiet on the Western Front and Westfront 1918 are universally hailed as the two greatest First World War films ever produced, based as much on the astonishingly mobile cinematography of Arthur Edeson and Fritz Arno Wagner as on their masterly direction. Regrettable is the omission of Stosstrupp 1917 from this pantheon, for its cinematography by Karl Hasselmann is as uniformly dazzling. An enormous box-office hit upon its release on 20 February 1934, Stosstrupp 1917 was based on director Zoberlein’s own war memoirs, Der Glaube an Deutschland, to which Adolf Hitler contributed a foreword; was financed by the National Socialist government; and featured Wehrmacht and SA troops in its cast, which make its invisibility since 1945 more readily comprehensible. The picture has been banned in Germany since the end of the Nazi era. Prints that have circulated since then have been heavily censored and run less than 90 minutes, removing militaristic dialogue and diluting the film’s impact and painstaking realism; many of its pyrotechnics, for instance, were produced with real ammunition and explosives. The present release restores 21 minutes of missing footage. Directed by Hans Zöberlein, Franz Adam, Marian Kolb, and L. Schmid-Wildy. Starring Ludwig Schmid-Wildy, Beppo Brem, Max Zankl, Hans Possenbacher.
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